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Guest Vern Edwards

This question is for the government folks:

Do you work in an office that uses any of the following terms in reference to a job description: expeditor, contracting expeditor, procurement expeditor, purchasing expeditor, or project expeditor?

Thanks.

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While we used those terms in the private sector, since I have been in the Gov't sector, nope.

now we have some people that do some of the functions of what and expeditor may do, but more as an additional duty.

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Vern,

Not in a job description, but the label "expeditor" is applied to those individuals given system rights to assign and reassign work in PRISM, our acquisition software. Because that's a supervisory function, supervisors are "expeditors" within the system, but that term is, as far as I can tell, otherwise meaningless.

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The "expeditor" exists (unofficially) in the agency our contracting office supports.

After our agency customer dithers with a procurement request (funds, SOW, market research results, etc), staring at their navel I guess, for months and months and months on end, and upon finally getting the request, their "expeditor"starts riding our butts only hours later to get the contract awarded yesterday. :blink:

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  • 3 weeks later...

We have Parts Expeditors in the Navy. In my 8 years as a Storekeeper in the Navy (now called Logistics Specialist), we deal with Expeditors most of the time. CASREP which stands for Casualty Report may require repair parts which are high priority requirements. Absence of the CASREP parts will degrade the ship's ability to perform its mission. Contact information for CASREP Expeditors in the Navy can be found here: https://www.navsup.navy.mil/navsup/ourteam/navsupwss/prod_serv/support/csg/casrep_expeditors

Govt Civilian LSR's (Logistic Support Representatives) assigned to a particluar ship act also as Expeditors as they physically deliver urgent parts to the ship. Our contracting office handles CASREP requirements for repair services of XYZ systems. If the CASREP requires repair part(s), it will be procured through the Navy Supply System (MILSTRIP requisition).

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Guest Vern Edwards

The term "expeditor" has been around for a very long time. The term was used by the Air Force when I was in base contracting in the 1970s. It is used in commercial purchasing and in project management to designate a person whose job it is to make sure that things get done. In purchasing, the expeditor is the person who does "purchasing followup" with a vendor to make sure deliveries will made on time and to the right place or to determine why they weren't.There was usually a person in an office whose job it was to keep track of upcoming delivery dates and to follow up on purchase orders to find out how things stood on late deliveries, and that person was called the Expeditor. See "Purchasing and Expediting - The True Facts," at the website of the Institute for Supply Management, http://www.ism.ws/pu...emNumber=11828. See also "Project Expediting," at http://www.born2proc...0Expediting.pdf and "What is the Role of the Project Expeditor" at http://www.projectma...ject-expeditor. The term is used variously and there is no standard definition for it. Similar titles used include project manager (for small projects), project coordinator, and project facilitator.

I am working on an article about CORs and COTRs and the thought had occurred to me that their role is similar to that of an project expeditor. I was curious to see if the term is still in use in the government world. Apparently, it is and it isn't.

Thanks.

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