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#41 FAR Fetched

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Posted 26 February 2011 - 07:39 PM

You're in charge - Now What? Thomas J. Neff & James M. Citrin

Great book for Managers, VPs and C-levels starting at new company.

#42 autodidact1257

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Posted 02 March 2011 - 06:22 PM

Hot To Cook Husbands - Worthington & Avilla. Great Read for the about to wed.

#43 Maureen

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Posted 13 April 2011 - 12:29 PM

"Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell" - by Susanna Clarke. Victorian era fiction about magic. Though I am listening to it in the car. And I think I am glad that I am listening; I am not so sure I would have stuck with this by reading it. Slowly but surely it is catching my interest. Did the same with "The Historian". Really am enjoying having a book to listen to on the drive home. I am actually reading "The Merlot Murders" by Ellen Crosby.

#44 Don Mansfield

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Posted 13 April 2011 - 02:07 PM

The Zombie Survival Guide: Complete Protection from the Living Dead by Max Brooks. Skip this one at your peril.

#45 autodidact1257

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Posted 19 April 2011 - 12:33 PM

The Zombie Survival Guide: Complete Protection from the Living Dead by Max Brooks. Skip this one at your peril.


ANNIHILATION: How to Deal with people who must have the last word - M.C. Yekcih. This is a must read for WIFCON participants.

#46 Vern Edwards

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Posted 20 April 2011 - 12:52 PM

The Nature of Explanation, by Peter Achinstein.

Table of Contents:

1. Introduction
2. Explaining
3. What Is An Explanation?
4. The Evaluation of Explanations
5. Can There Be A Model of Scientific Explanation?
6. The Causal Relation
7. Causal Explanation
8. Functional Explanation
9. The Limits of Explanation
10. Evidence and Explanation
11. Evidence: Additional Topics

Think justification for other than full and open competition. Think debriefing. Think prenegotiation objectives. Think price negotiation memorandum. Think source selection memorandum. Think COs final decision. Think determination to do or not do this or that.

Worthwhile professional reading for anyone who wants to think deeply about an important topic.

#47 br549

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Posted 21 April 2011 - 02:36 PM

Atlas Shrugged by Ayn Rand

#48 Contractor FLA

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Posted 27 April 2011 - 02:35 PM

"The Nature of Explanation"??? I think I'll wait for the movie to come out.

#49 Mike_wolff

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Posted 09 May 2011 - 10:43 PM

Just finished "Lau's Laws on Hitting: The Art of Hitting .400 for the Next Generation"

An EXCELLENT book for anyone who has kids in little league or above, or who still try to play the great game of baseball themselves (although my knees aren't up to catching like they used to be). I'm also feeling my age because I read the original book by Charlie Lau (The Art of Hitting .300) back when I was a little leaguer, and now I read this book by his son and have had both my boys read it as well.

Just staring "Horse Soldier" by Doug Stanton. I read his book "In Harm's Way," which was excellent, and I'm told this book is as well.

Mike

#50 Vern Edwards

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Posted 10 May 2011 - 05:45 AM

"The Nature of Explanation"??? I think I'll wait for the movie to come out.

Try Forms of Explanation, by Alan G. Garfinkel. It's shorter.

But if it's entertainment you want, try Who Goes There?, an old (1938) science fiction novella by John W. Campbell. Scientists are trapped in an Antarctic research station with a very unpleasant visitor. Very suspenseful and unnerving.

The story was the inspiration for the movies "The Thing From Another World" (1951), and "The Thing" (1982). It also inspired "Alien". A remake (prequel) entitled, "The Thing," is due for release later this year. (The heroine is supposedly modeled on the Ripley character in "Alien.") Of the two earlier "Thing" movies, the first is a lot of fun, with some great lines ("What if it can read minds?" "If it can, it's gonna be real mad when it gets to me.") ("Warn the world! Watch the skies! Keep watching the skies!") ("You can't destroy it! Think what it means to the world!" "I'm not working for the world, I'm working for the Air Force.") and some fun thrills. The second is closer to the original story and occasionally very scary, violent, and gory, but has no real laughs and has an over-the-top ending that ruins it for me. In short, it's a typical John Carpenter film.

The novella is available for Kindle, iPad, Nook, etc. You can also get it in pdf at http://www.whogoesth...fo/download.php and at a number of other websites. I have long suspected that the original story might have been a metaphor for communist infiltration, but I haven't been able to confirm that.

#51 bob7947

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Posted 10 May 2011 - 06:10 AM

Of course, you know who played The Thing in the 1951 version.

From alien vegetable to Marshall of Dodge City.

#52 FAR Fetched

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Posted 10 May 2011 - 07:26 AM

Just finished Ahead of the Curve by Philip Delves Broughton

I suggest this book an audio as the author's English accent made this book enjoyable; great listening for a commute.

#53 Vern Edwards

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Posted 10 May 2011 - 08:17 AM

Of course, you know who played The Thing in the 1951 version.

From alien vegetable to Marshall of Dodge City.

James Arness. He also starred in my other favorite "horror" movie: Them!

#54 Kid Acquisition

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Posted 13 May 2011 - 11:00 AM

"Sex, Drugs, and Cocoa Puffs", dont remember the author, but great read.

#55 PortlandCO

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Posted 13 May 2011 - 12:57 PM

The Black Swan: The Impact of the Highly Improbable by Nassim Nicholas Taleb, 2007. No, this is not related to the movie. Taleb's other book on this topic is Fooled By Randomness and both are great.

#56 here_2_help

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Posted 18 May 2011 - 04:38 PM

In the 1960's, H. Peam Piper wrote a classic SF novel, "Little Fuzzy". Award-winning SF novelist John Scalzi has "rebooted" the novel and (with the permission of the Piper estate) just published it as "Fuzzy Nation". That's what I'm reading now.

#57 jad

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Posted 24 January 2012 - 02:48 PM

Okay, what the heck, I'll see if I can get this interesting thread moving again.

I am currently reading Kissinger 1973, The Crucial Year by Alistair Horne. It is proving the be a thoroughly fascinating read about one of the most tumultuous years in American, and world history. I highly recommend it.

#58 Vern Edwards

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Posted 24 January 2012 - 03:13 PM

A World Undone: The Story of the Great War, 1914 - 1918, by G. L. Meyer.

#59 woops85

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Posted 24 January 2012 - 04:11 PM

George Orwell's 1984. Been so long that I couldn't remember if I'd ever read it in its entirety or just parts

#60 shinaku

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Posted 26 January 2012 - 12:02 AM

Recently finished - Into the Silence: The Great War, Mallory and the Conquest of Everest, by Wade Davis.




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