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Common sense aside, is there anything in writing that states that a Contractor providing "Acquisition Support" (1102 type work, other than signing the documents) has to have the same basic education requirements as the 1102s that would be doing the same work in the same office?

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No-the PWS/SOW for each instant requirement must specify the required qualifications for contractor personnel. Why would common sense dictate that they are the same? If the Government wants an 1102, they should post a vacancy on usajobs.gov, if they want a contractor, they should use a contractor.

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No-the PWS/SOW for each instant requirement must specify the required qualifications for contractor personnel. Why would common sense dictate that they are the same? If the Government wants an 1102, they should post a vacancy on usajobs.gov, if they want a contractor, they should use a contractor.

To me, it would make sense for it to be the same. It's doing the same work, so why shouldn't the qualification to do that work be the same? I can think of reasons you'd need 1102 work to be done and not hire Civil Service (temporary increase in workload being the first one I think of).

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To me, it would make sense for it to be the same. It's doing the same work, so why shouldn't the qualification to do that work be the same? I can think of reasons you'd need 1102 work to be done and not hire Civil Service (temporary increase in workload being the first one I think of).

The contractor is there to do the work and make money. Why would they need to be the same, some of the positions in the government have to many qualifications.

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The contractor is there to do the work and make money. Why would they need to be the same, some of the positions in the government have to many qualifications.

Gee, are you a contractor, "to"?

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Guest Vern Edwards

The problem here is the meaning of "1102 type work." What does that mean? 1102s perform a lot of administrative tasks, such as data entry. If that's the kind of work that's being discussed, then I don't see any reason why contractors can't do it, and I don't see why they need 1102 qualifications to do it. On the other hand, real 1102 work--thinking about and solving complex problems, negotiating and managing long-term and complex deals, and making and explaining important decisions for which you may be criticized--demands higher qualifications than a modern bachelor's degree and completion of a bunch of DAU/FAI courses.

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Guest carl r culham

Some departments require that a "acquisition workforce" contractor must at a minimum have the same level of training as their Federal counterpart (see USDA AGAR Advisory No 85, Part 2, Para. 15). I for one believe it does make sense to do so. The standards that spin off of DAWIA to both DoD and the civilian workforce are a great step in setting a knowledge standard for a acquisition workforce member and as such applying these standards to a contracted workforce is something I would do even if the agency I worked for did not require it. So where would I start? While they do not mandate it I would go to OFPP Policy Letter 05-01 and OMB Memo 06-01 and start there in drafting the training/education requirements of the PWS/SOW.

Also it is a little bit of a stretch but I would interpret FAR 52.203-13 to require that a contractor holding an acquisition assistance contract would develop a training plan for the workers that was simliar to that for the Federal workforce that is performing the same work.

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The problem here is the meaning of "1102 type work." What does that mean? 1102s perform a lot of administrative tasks, such as data entry. If that's the kind of work that's being discussed, then I don't see any reason why contractors can't do it, and I don't see why they need 1102 qualifications to do it. On the other hand, real 1102 work--thinking about and solving complex problems, negotiating and managing long-term and complex deals, and making and explaining important decisions for which you may be criticized--demands higher qualifications than a modern bachelor's degree and completion of a bunch of DAU/FAI courses.

I apologize for not being more detailed. The types of duties I am referring to is basically everything a Contract Specialist without a warrant would do. Prepare all pre-award documents (to include the Pre-negotiation Memorandum, Responsibility Determination, Determination of Price Reasonableness, Price Negotiation Memorandum, etc...) for the CO's signature. The contractors also perform post-award functions to include everything except the actual signing of the document(s). To me, the level of knowledge required to prepare this documentation is at least that of the education/training that 1102s are required to possess.

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Gee, are you a contractor, "to"?

No, I'm actually a government employee. I see allot of things that can be done at work that do not require a higher education. I've also seen job postings by the government that require you to have a masters degree to run an office of 10 people (which may or may not be true, but I doubt)

Not every function I do requires me to use my degree. Importing and filing, filling in contract completion statements, printing documents to support contract closeout, posting notes in spreadsheets, determining why a contract is overage. Don't think I named a job yet that requires anything but a high school education.

Those duties could easily be handled by a contractor. Just thinking outside a box on how someone would attempt to make money.

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Also it is a little bit of a stretch but I would interpret FAR 52.203-13 to require that a contractor holding an acquisition assistance contract would develop a training plan for the workers that was simliar to that for the Federal workforce that is performing the same work.

Carl, as in - performing the same contract specialist/acquisition assistance work of the specific agency they would be contracted to for performing such work?

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As long as the contractor is able to perform the work -

basically everything a Contract Specialist without a warrant would do. Prepare all pre-award documents (to include the Pre-negotiation Memorandum, Responsibility Determination, Determination of Price Reasonableness, Price Negotiation Memorandum, etc...) for the CO's signature. The contractors also perform post-award functions to include everything except the actual signing of the document(s)
- what difference does it make whether they had the 1102 training requirments?

The only reason I think some agencies like Carl mentioned require it is that its a simple and easy standard to apply. But we all know 1102s that have all the course through level III and can't write a simple acquisition plan or train an group on how to conduct proposal evaluations.

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