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It doesn't have to be the same physician person every day -- but when the customarily-assigned physician is absent for any reason, the contractor must provide a substitute.

Let me know how that goes.  "Substitute Doctor" isn't really a professional designation I'm familiar with.  Who certifies on a moment's notice that Dr. Backup is qualified?  

Nothing says quality patient care like the words "Hello; you don't know me, and I've never seen you before in my life and am not familiar with your case, but you'll be putting your life in my hands until further notice".

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Guest Vern Edwards
12 minutes ago, REA'n Maker said:

Let me know how that goes.  "Substitute Doctor" isn't really a professional designation I'm familiar with. 

ji20874 said "a physician." There is a difference between contracting for "a physician" and contracting for Dr. Ben Casey, M.D.

12 minutes ago, REA'n Maker said:

Who certifies on a moment's notice that Dr. Backup is qualified? 

Whoever issues licenses to practice medicine in the jurisdiction in question.

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5 minutes ago, Vern Edwards said:
17 minutes ago, REA'n Maker said:

Who certifies on a moment's notice that Dr. Backup is qualified? 

Whoever issues licenses to practice medicine.

So you're saying that every position has to actually be filled by 2 people, who are certified in advance,  so that in case one is out, the other can parachute in at a moment's notice? 

 

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Guest Vern Edwards
12 minutes ago, REA'n Maker said:

Nothing says quality patient care like the words "Hello; you don't know me, and I've never seen you before in my life, and I'm not familiar with your case, but you'll be putting your life in my hands until further notice".

When I was a cop in L.A. in the late 1960s, two officers were shot down in a confrontation with some criminals. My partner and I were the first on the scene. One had been shot in the head and the other had been shot in the groin. The cops were taken to L.A. Central Receiving Hospital. It's not likely they knew the receiving doctor or the surgeon. Both survived to tell the tale and work again.

When I was soldier in Vietnam in the mid-1960s, I knew several men who had been badly wounded and medevaced to a hospital at base camp and then on to another hospital, and then another. Most of them survived their wounds. I doubt that any of them knew any of the doctors who worked on them.

You're reaching, REA'n Maker, far beyond your grasp.

 

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Guest Vern Edwards
Just now, REA'n Maker said:

So you're saying that every position has to actually be filled by 2 people, who are certified in advance, so that in case one is out, the other can parachute in at a moment's notice? 

I'm not saying any such thing. I'm saying that the contractor is obligated to perform in accordance with the terms of the contract and must make provision to do so. How they do that is generally up to them unless the contract provides otherwise.

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There is a difference between contracting for "a physician" and contracting for Dr. Ben Casey, M.D.

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When I was a cop in L.A.

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When I was soldier in Vietnam

Nothing in your anecdotes has anything to do with the point of professional services not being readily transferable to a "backup". 

 I've actually written these types of contracts for physicians at the VA, and they are  comparable to personal services.  So no, I'm not grasping.

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Guest Vern Edwards
11 minutes ago, REA'n Maker said:

Nothing in your anecdotes has anything to do with the point of professional services not being readily transferable to a "backup". 

And nothing about the term "professional services" says that it refers to a specific person. Maybe that's just the way your contracts were written. In order for a contract to be a personal services contract in the general sense of the law, i.e., a personal contract, as opposed to the sense in which the term is used in FAR Part 37, the contract must name a specific person.

 

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34 minutes ago, Vern Edwards said:

I'm saying that the contractor is obligated to perform in accordance with the terms of the contract and must make provision to do so.

You could always include  "FAR 52.217-10  Vulcan Mind Meld (Sep 1966)" .

(I hereby declare this horse "dead").

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Guest Vern Edwards
20 minutes ago, REA'n Maker said:

I guess you could include  "FAR 52.217-10  Vulcan Mind Meld (Sep 1966)" .

I suppose you're making an attempt at wit. It makes no more sense than your earlier remarks.

What can and can't be done in terms of personnel substitution depends on the terms of the contract. Period. Agencies enter into contracts for professional services without requiring the performance of a particular professional. They do it all the time.

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