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Is there a FAR prohibition on designating multiple CORs on a contract? According to FAR 1.602-2(d) (reference pasted below), a CO must designate "a" COR, which is the only reference I can find that could be interpreted as restricting the number of CORs on an award.  Is there authority in the FAR which supports the use of more than one COR if each COR has non-overlapping and discrete responsibilities? Do other Agencies utilize multiple CORs on a contract? Any guidance would be appreciated. 

1.602-2 -- Responsibilities.

(d) Designate and authorize, in writing and in accordance with agency procedures, "a" contracting officer’s representative (COR) on all contracts and orders other than those that are firm-fixed price, and for firm-fixed-price contracts and orders as appropriate, unless the contracting officer retains and executes the COR duties. See 7.104(e). A COR—

(1) Shall be a Government employee, unless otherwise authorized in agency regulations;

(2) Shall be certified and maintain certification in accordance with the current Office of Management and Budget memorandum on the Federal Acquisition Certification for Contracting Officer Representatives (FAC-COR) guidance, or for DoD, in accordance with the current applicable DoD policy guidance;

(3) Shall be qualified by training and experience commensurate with the responsibilities to be delegated in accordance with agency procedures;

(4) May not be delegated responsibility to perform functions that have been delegated under 42.202 to a contract administration office, but may be assigned some duties at 42.302 by the contracting officer;

(5) Has no authority to make any commitments or changes that affect price, quality, quantity, delivery, or other terms and conditions of the contract nor in any way direct the contractor or its subcontractors to operate in conflict with the contract terms and conditions;

(6) Shall be nominated either by the requiring activity or in accordance with agency procedures; and

(7) Shall be designated in writing, with copies furnished to the contractor and the contract administration office—

  • (i) Specifying the extent of the COR’s authority to act on behalf of the contracting officer;

    (ii) Identifying the limitations on the COR’s authority;

    (iii) Specifying the period covered by the designation;

    (iv) Stating the authority is not redelegable; and

    (v) Stating that the COR may be personally liable for unauthorized acts.

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I am not aware of any prohibition in the FAR on appointment of more than one COR with separate duties.  

For DOD, the PGI at 201.602-2 (d)(v)(A) says that the KO “should consider” the appointment of multiple CORs for certain contracts. 

I don’t know if the Corps of Engineers still does this but in the Districts that I was assigned to, it was common practice in the 1990’s and 2000’s to appoint more than one COR on a construction contract. The separate COR’s were always designated separate, limited and distinct duties, not overlapping with each other. That might no longer be the practice in that agency.  

Edit: I will add that the above practice of appointing more than one COR was prevalent prior to the development of the current, integrated contract administration software systems.

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Guest Vern Edwards
3 hours ago, karlakaye81 said:

Any guidance would be appreciated. 

There may be any number of reasons for appointing multiple CORs. For example, if the COR function is inspection as defined in FAR 2.101, and if the work is be done at several different locations simultaneously or delivery is to be made at widely dispersed locations, then a CO might need several inspectors. A CO also might need several inspectors if the nature of the work is such that various work requires various inspectors, each with special knowledge.

Do not interpret the indefinite article "a" in FAR 1.602-2(d) to mean appoint only one. Really, if you would think about your question for a moment it should be apparent that there might be many circumstances in which a CO might need multiple CORs, some for various functions, some in various situations or locations. The FAR does not preclude the appointment of more than one COR. However, if a CO must appoint more than one COR to perform a given COR function, he or she must take measures to ensure consistency among them.

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Karla,

on a contract such as LOGCAP, there may be as many as 60-70 COR's. If the contract has multiple, different services where one can't be a technical expert on everything (i.e. construction, power generation, DFAC's, vehicle maintenance, etc), then appointing several CORs are acceptable.  As stated, multiple locations are a factor too.  From a management standpoint, I've seen where the multiple CORs funnel their activities / surveillance results into one Lead COR.  

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