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Hello all,

Our office just got dinged because we haven't been keeping up on our training.

I've spent the better portion of the afternoon looking at what I could take, however I haven't found much. I am a level 3 certified, contracting professional with an MBA...so I'm questioning what next?

I did see the ad for the FAR Bootcamp,and it seems very interesting, however unfortunately it doesn't fit into my schedule (I need to go somewhere in January).

Any suggestions would be appreciated.

Thanks!

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Before you start looking for courses, I suggest that you determine what skill or ability you need to develop to do your job better. Then, determine how best to develop that skill or ability. The answer may or may not be a training course.

View training as a means to an end--not an end itself.

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Guest Vern Edwards

So, what do you want? A two day seminar about something? At the basic level or at an advanced level? If so, there are hundreds of such courses. Do some market research. Check out Federal Publications, Inc. Check out Public Contracting Institute. Google <government contracts training>.

As for The FAR Bootcamp, think twice before taking it. Many a Level 3, unlimited warrant holder, with an MBA or a JD or an MBA and a JD has learned on the very first morning of that course that they didn't know nearly as much as they thought they did and had to work really hard in order to pass. That course is not a "refresher" or a PowerPoint seminar in which attendance is all that is required to get a certificate. It's a very hard course. The managers of that program actually discourage people from taking it unless they know what they are getting into and are fully committed. Except for interns, they don't want people who take it only because they were ordered to do so, and they warn agencies not to order their personnel to take it. Don Acquisition took it in a class for the Marine Corps. Ask him. They really want people who take it because it's tough. Snobs, I guess.

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That course is not a "refresher" or a PowerPoint seminar in which attendance is all that is required to get a certificate. It's a very hard course.

That was the best part about the class, you had to use your brain and think on your toes. No PowerPoint droning on and on. Still fuming with myself over not remembering the name of FAR Part 6...otherwise could have graduated with honors. :rolleyes:

The worst part--you'll never find another class like this unless looking verrrry hard. Makes any training classes that management mandates after this one quite a snooze fest to attend.

In my- what next question- I'm challenging myself to reading, challenging, and understanding rather than depending on training to come around. Made it through the Cibinic and Nash Administration of Government Contracts most recently. Next I think I'll start on Formation of Government Contracts.

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Our office just got dinged because we haven't been keeping up on our training.

I've spent the better portion of the afternoon looking at what I could take, however I haven't found much. I am a level 3 certified, contracting professional with an MBA...so I'm questioning what next?

What about DAU and FAI - Are you adverse to the multitude of web-based courses available through DAU/FAI (OR have you taken ALL of those)? Core Plus development courses are plentiful and cover a variety of topics.

Do you work on Construction or A-E projects? How about plussing up your continuing education with some Facilities Engineering courses.

Are weapons systems your thing? Why not check out the boundless opportunities for learning about Life Cycle Logistics and Systems Engineering.

As almost any contracting professional ought to know, you can always (and I do mean always) use more education in the fine arts of negotiation and pricing.

How is it possible that someone with the knowledge to obtain an advanced degree cannot find continuing education opportunities in acquisition?

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As a follow-up, while there are many non-resident training opportunities that people often ignore for that chance at a trip somewhere, I recognize that the post is entitled "Resident Course Traiing Suggestions".

As before, there are some great DAU / FAI courses out there for consideration. CON 243 (A-E Contracts); CON 244 (Construction); CON 250 (CAS Fundamentals); CON 260 (Small Business Program); etc.

Practitioners might also consider some other sources for training:

Army Logistics University www.almc.army.mil

Air Force Institute of Technology (School of Systems & Logistics) www.afit.edu

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Guest Vern Edwards

I have an idea. Instead of taking CON 250, CAS Fundamentals (Part i) and CON 251, CAS Fundamentals (Part II), for a total of nine classroom days, buy a copy of the current CAS Board regulations from CCH or West (about $60) and download the CON 250 and CON 251 course materials from the DAU website and study them. Spend an hour or an hour and a half per day for a couple of weeks. I don't know about you, but unless I were a DCAA auditor I would not want to sit through nine days of CAS. In a typical lecture class day you'll be lucky (or extraordinary) to get and retain more than an hour or two of learning each day. Study seriously on your own and you'll retain more. It would be a good idea to own a first rate dictionary of business or accounting terms. You can find several on Amazon. Barron's little paperback is great and inexpensive.

You can learn a lot by reading on your own. It worked for me. When I was a government 1102 I made a career out of avoiding official classes.

I know that my suggestion won't help 1102ForLife with his/her CLE problem, but I can't solve everybody's problem.

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Besides formal training, there are other ways to obtain continuous learning points. One can earn CLPs following the self-directed study program that Vern describes above. From the DAU Continuous Learning Web site (http://www.dau.mil/clc/Pages/apv.aspx):

In addition to DAU courses, examples of continuous learning activities include:

Performing Self-Directed Study. An individual can keep current or enhance his or her capabilities through a self-directed study program agreed to by the supervisor.

This is how I meet my CLP requirement. The Web site provides many examples of ways to earn CLPs other than through formal training.

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Guest Vern Edwards

Set up small self-study/discussion groups among committed individuals. Emphasis on small and on committed. Don't waste time with people who won't keep up or who will flake out. Meet once every two weeks.

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