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Found 11 results

  1. Will 2021 NDAA Procurement Reforms Lead to More Small Business Contracts for DOD? The subject of acquisition reform has been a leading focus for the entire government in recent years, but has been an explicit priority for defense agencies of late. As the house armed services subcommittee begins their work on the 2021 defense authorization bill next week, may are wondering if the reform started in 2018, that paved the way for small business contracts within the DoD will continue. The National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) for FY 2018 simplified acquisitions between the range of $10,000
  2. The Section 809 Panel, created in section 809 of the FY 2016 National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA), is charged with recommending improvements to the defense acquisition process. In January 2018 the panel released their first volume of three, which provides guidance for simplifying the DoD procurement process in ways that could benefit contractors. Their insights shed light on the obstacles contractors face, and pave the road for changes in law to help overcome them. Read the full article at Petrillo & Powell's Patterns of Procurement.
  3. When the Department of Defense (DoD) sought restrictions on bid protests, Congress made them commission a study to validate their case. That study, authored by the RAND Corporation, looks at bid protests during the 9-year period from 2008-2016. The study indicates a significant increase in the number of bid protests over that time period. That trend alone bolsters the DoD’s case. But a further look at the extensive data from RAND’s study suggests otherwise, and provides critical insights for Defense contractors. Read the full article at Petrillo & Powell's Patterns of Procurement.
  4. @Vern Edwards has mentioned the idea of the Department of Defense (DOD) having its own acquisition laws and regulations-- completely separating it from civilian agency acquisition laws and regulations. Maybe you can throw in some other high-dollar, national-security-related agencies like Department of Homeland Security, Department of Energy, and National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The National Defense Authorization Act often includes DOD-specific legislation, so this wouldn't be a revolutionary change. PepeTheFrog hears rumors of the desire to legislate a "Defense Small Bu
  5. For the last several years, the DoD has bulked up regulations aimed at detecting and preventing electronic counterfeit parts within Government contracts. Two major clauses apply these regulations to defense contractors: “Contractor Counterfeit Electronic Part Detection and Avoidance System,” and “Sources of Electronic Parts.” Here’s a summary of the main points of each clause. Read the full article at Petrillo & Powell's Patterns of Procurement.
  6. VATEP is a new method of acquisition that the DoD announced in April 2016. VATEP, which stands for Value Adjusted Total Evaluated Price, is a variant on best value procurements, and seeks to quantify technical superiority in dollar terms when there is a cost/technical tradeoff. It should, in theory, make it easier for the contractor to understand how much it will be rewarded for offering a technically superior proposal. It should also make it easier for the Government to evaluate such proposals. Read the full article at Petrillo & Powell's Patterns of Procurement to learn more about the ad
  7. Sometimes the Government seeks the best overall value, and at times simply lowest cost. But even when low price is determinative, the bidder must still meet minimum technical qualifications. In a recent case, Level 3 Communications lost a major contract with the Dept. of Defense to Verizon, whose bid exceeded theirs by nearly $40 million. Level 3 was disqualified for what it thought were trivial reasons. When Level 3 protested, it got no relief from GAO, but the Court of Federal Claims came to their rescue. More at Petrillo & Powell's Patterns of Procurement.
  8. Contracts with the Federal Government represent big bucks for technology companies. According to ITDashboard.gov, government agencies spent a whopping $82.8 billion on information technology investments in FY2016, a number that’s poised to grow in the next two years. It’s no wonder, then, that technology companies take government contracts seriously. So when tech giant Palantir Technologies could not get the Army to consider its commercial IT system, they protested. And ultimately, the Court of Federal Claims decided in their favor. View the full article here.
  9. Just stopping by to share an interesting read (via Politico) regarding the current pricing environment in the Department of Defense. Enjoy and looking forward to the discussion! http://www.politico.com/story/2016/04/defense-pentagon-spending-assad-221776
  10. I am pretty involved with several Alpha Contracting efforts here at Department of Army. Anyone else out there ever involved in Alpha Contracting? Thoughts? Observations? Good experiences? Bad Experiences? Would love to have anyone's 2 cents on the topic.
  11. So I am seeking opinions, and hopefully evidence. I want to consider the DFARS definition of consolidation of requirements only, and not to even discuss bundling, my scenario is OCONUS and FAR 19 for the most part doesn't apply and neither does bundling. However, DFARS part 7 does apply and there is debate regarding how to apply the definition of consolidation to construction requirements. DFARS -207.170-2 Definitions. “Consolidation of contract requirements” means the use of a solicitation to obtain offers for a single contract or a multiple award contract to satisfy two or more requirement
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