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Found 6 results

  1. I am working on a enterprise service contract follow on effort for a DoD 4th Estate agency, and looking for any enterprise service RFP's that you can share the RFP link from beta.sam.gov. The RFP can be for a multiple award IDIQ ,single awardee, or anything in between. It can be from a non DoD agency as well. The purpose of casting this wide net is to get ideas, see any innovative source selection methods etc. If your RFP/program requires fully burdened labor rates, even better! If a link isn't available from beta.sam.gov and you'd need to email me the RFP, send me a message and I will provide you with my work email. Thanks in advance!
  2. As Congress continues to deliberate on the 2021 National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA), many small business contractors are wondering if the reforms started in 2018 will continue. The FY 2018 and 2019 NDAA both contained positive provisions for small businesses. From making it easier for small businesses to win follow-on contracts, to encouraging prompt payment of small business contractors, to increasing the amount of funding that can be authorized through the rapid prototyping program and specifically directing small businesses to apply, previous NDAAs greatly encouraged the viability of small business contracts and incentivized defense agencies to further utilize small business contracts. Regardless of the final direction of the NDAA, adopting a strong small business procurement posture makes continued sense for the DoD. NITAAC understands the importance of small businesses to defense contracting. America’s nearly 30 million small businesses are the backbone of our economy. They also provide critical goods, services and technologies which actively contribute to the health of the manufacturing and defense industrial base. The NITAAC Chief Information Officer-Solutions and Partners 3 Small Business Government-Wide Acquisition Contract (CIO-SP3 Small Business GWAC) is uniquely positioned to help the DoD accomplish its information technology missions. With 10 task areas covering virtually every defense agency need, CIO-SP3 Small Business contractors offer innovative solutions that are capable of meeting upcoming modernization and acquisition reform priorities, such as software licensing and cloud computing. Even better, CIO-SP3 Small Business customers benefit from built-in Fair Opportunity competition, no protests for awards under $25 million for the DOD and unparalleled customer support. CIO-SP3 Small Business makes vetting and competing small business awards easy. With a $20 billion contract ceiling spanning five socioeconomic categories, including Small Business (SB), Women-Owned Small Business (WOSB), 8(a), Service Disabled Veteran Owned Small Business (SDVOSB), and Historically Underutilized Business Zone (HUBZone), there are no better options for the DoD when soliciting small business products and solutions and meeting small business goals.
  3. @Vern Edwards has mentioned the idea of the Department of Defense (DOD) having its own acquisition laws and regulations-- completely separating it from civilian agency acquisition laws and regulations. Maybe you can throw in some other high-dollar, national-security-related agencies like Department of Homeland Security, Department of Energy, and National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The National Defense Authorization Act often includes DOD-specific legislation, so this wouldn't be a revolutionary change. PepeTheFrog hears rumors of the desire to legislate a "Defense Small Business Act" and move all small business contracting laws under Title 10, Armed Forces. This would exempt DOD from Title 15 and the Small Business Act. It would allow DOD to run small business programs with total autonomy and independence from the Small Business Act and the Small Business Administration. (1) What do you think of the political feasibility? Would this cause a fight between the H/S Small Business Committees and the H/S Armed Services Committees? (2) How should DOD shape its own small business contracting and small business programs? The 2018 National Defense Strategy focuses on lethality, rapid acquisition, acquisition reform, and technological innovation from small businesses. (3) PepeTheFrog hears rumor of the desire to let the civilian agencies handle the "breadline" socioeconomic stuff and let DOD focus on getting innovative technology from small businesses, rather than distributing taxpayer money to a specific ethnicity, sex, or economic region. If that happens, the Small Business Act goal of 23 percent will be impossible to meet because DOD spending is usually more than half of that effort. Of course, that would be the point of exemption from the Small Business Act. (4) If you could eliminate any of the small business programs in DOD, which would you eliminate? Which would you keep? Why?
  4. Just stopping by to share an interesting read (via Politico) regarding the current pricing environment in the Department of Defense. Enjoy and looking forward to the discussion! http://www.politico.com/story/2016/04/defense-pentagon-spending-assad-221776
  5. I am pretty involved with several Alpha Contracting efforts here at Department of Army. Anyone else out there ever involved in Alpha Contracting? Thoughts? Observations? Good experiences? Bad Experiences? Would love to have anyone's 2 cents on the topic.
  6. So I am seeking opinions, and hopefully evidence. I want to consider the DFARS definition of consolidation of requirements only, and not to even discuss bundling, my scenario is OCONUS and FAR 19 for the most part doesn't apply and neither does bundling. However, DFARS part 7 does apply and there is debate regarding how to apply the definition of consolidation to construction requirements. DFARS -207.170-2 Definitions. “Consolidation of contract requirements” means the use of a solicitation to obtain offers for a single contract or a multiple award contract to satisfy two or more requirements of a department, agency, or activity for supplies or services that previously have been provided to, or performed for, that department, agency, or activity under two or more separate contracts. Furthermore, the DoD Office of Small Business Programs further defines bundling and consolidation in their Guidebook dated Oct 2007. http://www.acq.osd.mil/osbp/news/Bundling%20Guidebook%20October%202007.pdf in this guidebook the definition of consolidation states "As recently defined in statute, for a consolidation to exist, the proposed acquisition must be combining two or more requirements that were previously provided or performed under separate contracts." It also gives a definition of consolidation and "new work" in that it says a previously performed requirement combined with "new work, i.e., work that has never been performed under contract." is still consolidating. So how would these definitions ever apply to construction? The argument is that Agency XYZ has previously built a Dining Facility at Fort Fairy Tale. So when you go to build a Dining Facility at Fort Dumbo you have a previously performed requirement under a separate contract. I disagree with that interpretation, they are totally separate requirements because they are totally separate locations with different environments, site conditions, etc. In conclusion I don't see how consolidation definition can ever apply to construction. I can see how bundling could apply to construction because that has to do with limiting small business participation. But I believe consolidation strictly applies to supplies/services. For those who know construction, there are individuals that believe if you combine two facilities, you are "consolidating", and then those who think only when you combine separately appropriated Project Numbers it is considered "consolidating". I have yet to been given any evidence supporting these claims, just passing along the info I've been given, and not saying there isn't evidence either. Agree? Disagree? Have any evidence? Let me know. Thanks!
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