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ji20874

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About ji20874

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  1. Types of orders

    The word "calls" is used in FAR 4.1603(a)(3)(vi) and (viii) and also in FAR 4.606(a)(1)(iii). Generally, I think of the issuance of an order under an indefinite-delivery vehicle (as that term is defined in FAR 4.606(a)(1)(ii)) as being done by a contracting officer or purchasing agent on paper (OF Form 347 or DD Form 1155) with a funds citation, and I think of the issuance of a call under a Blanket Purchase Agreement (BPA) as a verbal purchase made by a person authorized (such as by FAR 13.303-3(a)(4)) with a single monthly invoice and payment for all purchases made during a month. However, I admit there is tremendous variation (even sloppiness) in the use of "call" and "order" among contracting practitioners. "Call order" is new for me.
  2. UCA - Required Contract Clauses

    The order (DD Form 1155) that references the BOA should incorporate by reference the provisions of the BOA -- see FAR 16.703(d)(2)(ii). I'm just wondering... Is there really a BOA? Is this a DPAS rated order that the contractor must accept?
  3. UCA - Required Contract Clauses

    It seems you received an order under a BOA. There are no clauses to be "read into the UCA." Any clauses that apply should already be in the order itself or in the BOA. Regarding the pricing of the work, you will want to read FAR 16.703(d)(3).
  4. The Problem of Proposal-Based Competition

    Junius, Another way to say it: contracting officers are no longer expected to be professionals that delivery the best possible business solutions to help accomplish an agency's mission -- rather, they are expected to be clerks. "Management and lawyers" want a procurement program that spends money and generates little risk, while caring little or nothing about the best possible business solutions to help accomplish an agency's mission.
  5. Court Order and the FAR

    If a court orders a psych exam, wouldn't the agency have some discretion about how to carry it out? For example, if DOJ was the target of the order, could it use one of it employees to do the exam? or use a VA employee? But if the agency elects to use a contractor, it would be very easy -- a simple purchase order, sole-source or competitive as needed, using the agency's normal procurement authority/processes and appropriated funds. It might get more problematic if a court orders an agency to do something that goes beyond the agency's authorization and appropriations acts, but that isn't the case here.
  6. Tomahawk, So everything is clear? And there is no problem? That's good!
  7. Tomahawk, I recommend you ask the contracting officer for clarification on which parts of the work are FFP and which parts of the work are T&M. Hopefully, the answer will be on a CLIN basis, where certain CLINs are wholly FFP and other CLINs are wholly T&M -- that is generally easier than having blended CLINs. A prospective offeror never has much time before proposals are due, so I suggest you hurry.
  8. Vern makes a good point -- I think my most professionally rewarding and learning years were spent as a contracting officer in program offices working directly with program managers. When arguments arose about my appraisal, I was always in favor of the program manager doing the writing/signing rather than the contracts chief.
  9. You should get rid of that expectation. A business owner can read the FAR as well as a contracting officer, or can hire the expertise to effectively participate in the government market. I think "trust but verify" can apply here. Yes, contracting officers will sometimes release solicitations with poorly-written CLIN schedules and so forth. In those situations, I hope prospective offerors will share recommendations for improving the approach. If they do, the resulting contract might be better for both parties. Where prospective offerors don't share recommendations, or the contracting officer doesn't accept them, prospective offerors have to make a business decision: continue to play or walk away. But this is true for all business arrangements everywhere, not just those with the government. In the commercial market, it is very common for buyers to walk in and explain what they're looking for, and for sellers to advise them that they (the buyers) really don't want that. Maybe the sellers are effective in changing the minds of the buyers, or maybe not. I tend to think sellers (or prospective Government contractors) should be experts in offering and packaging their services, and specifying payment terms -- and that is what a CLIN structure is, after all -- so yes, I think prospective contractors can be helpful to contracting officers in crafting CLIN structures that fit their market sectors.
  10. If you want to know why the prime contractor is doing what it is doing, you must ask the prime contractor. There is no mandatory connection or correlation between the contract type negotiated between the Government and the prime contractor and the contract type negotiated between the prime contractor and any subcontractor.
  11. REA, I most earnestly hope that the CLIN structure IS NOT set up like I asked -- but based on the original posting and the comments, I am wondering. I hope the answer is NO, because indeed that would be very poor tradecraft -- but I have seen a lot of poor tradecraft regarding T&M lately.
  12. So, maybe the solicitation CLIN structure is notionally something like this? 0001, Services, 2080 HR, unit price $100, amount $1,200 (FFP) 0002, Materials, reimbursable at cost (T&M, M only)
  13. I recommend you ask the contracting officer for clarification on which parts of the work are FFP and which parts of the work are T&M. Hopefully, the answer will be on a CLIN basis, where certain CLINs are wholly FFP and other CLINs are wholly T&M -- that is generally easier than having blended CLINs. A prospective offeror never has much time before proposals are due, so I suggest you hurry.
  14. GSA CTAs

    Then there is no need for that schedule contractor to enter into a CTA.
  15. Does the contract specify the working hours? Will the change be a verbal agreement, or will it be an official contract modification on a SF-30? If the latter, what authority will be cited in block 13?
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