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Sandi78

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About Sandi78

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  1. I agree with Schooner and Gordon.
  2. A template may not work for everyone. But a good place to start is an AF3052 Construction Cost Estimate Breakdown. I believe you should be able to Google it and find one.
  3. Career Paths for an INTP

    LucyQ, I would like to offer some advice, which I feel is what you are looking for. I notice the subject of this forum is "Contracting Workforce" and if you can't come here to ask for advice and share how you feel about 'contracting' - then I think the forum should be deleted. Only you can decide what your career path should be and most companies have a career path guide that you can consult. If your company doesn't have one, then ask your supervisor and leaders what their plan is for you. It sounds like you are working for someone who believes in you since they have invested a lot of time in your training. I caution you to think long and hard before going somewhere else, no matter what is promised, because not a lot of companies are going to invest time in your training. You can join some professional organizations such as NCMA to help you figure out what you're missing. Talk with other people in your network to see how they feel about their career progression. Don't forget the older generation and if you're close enough, just point blank ask them, what are your regrets? Ask them for any advice they have for you. Hindsight is 20/20. If you read up on the contracting workforce, a lot of it is at retiring age and the next few years there will be many exiting the career field, which is going to cause a gap that the millenials can fill. I feel that millenials need to be mentored and the passion for contracting shared with them. I have worked with many millenials (may even be considered one myself) and I have observed that many millenials are not excited about contracting because they think it's an exercise in paper pushing. If you like contracting and enjoy it, which it sounds like you may, then you can decide if you want to keep doing it. Only you know what you're suited for. I would like to urge you to get your degree. I realize that you may not feel that you learn anything from it;but, it gives you that piece of paper which is going to open doors for you. If you ever decide to pursue a civil service contracting career, a degree will be necessary. A bachelor's degree is not enough anymore, a master's is necessary to make you competitive.
  4. CORs in Construction

    Yes we have traditionally called them inspectors, as well. The CORT tool is a system that tracks all COR related data, paperwork, etc. CORs have to upload their training certificates and surveillance documents in the system for approval by the CO. Apparently, the 'inspectors' will now have to become full fledged CORs - which requires additional training, financial disclosure and the minimum requirement of being a government employee. Some inspectors are actually Title II and not employees of DoD.
  5. I am at a base level operational contracting office. A new DoDi came out 26 Mar 15 - number 500.72 - titled DoD Standard for Contracting Officer's Representative Certification. Apparently this new instruction mandates COR's for construction contracts and the inclusion of these COR's in the CORT tool. Am I missing something, but haven't COR's always been required for construction contracts? The reason I am curious is anyone else trying to come up with a plan to comply with this requirement? Does anyone else within DoD use CORT tool for their construction CORs ? This office has had 'inspectors' but never full fledged CORs.....just posting for a little discussion.
  6. Yes you did. So far, I think the CO sees it our way now. No problem straying - I always learn something.
  7. Mr. Edwards - any advice on how to prove this to someone. Other than the obvious - the ruling states for procurement of A-E Services and that the rule is found under the supbpart applicable to architect -engineer services. There is nothing anywhere else in the FAR Part 36 that refers to this. I have to prove this to a CO that has thirty years experience in construction.
  8. Mr. Edwards - I should know better. Thanks for correcting me.
  9. Thanks retreadfed. However, I don't see the reference to CPFF in the clause anywhere. I am trying to determine if design costs can exceed 6% of a project's estimated construction costs on a construction project. This subpart refers to contracts written to architects/engineers.
  10. To what contracts does this clause apply? Specifically, does this clause apply to a firm fixed price construction contract ? The contract is being purchased off an IDIQ, the RFP contained 'concept' design drawings (30%), it is the contractor's responsibility to bring the design to 100% and construct the project. My gut feeling is that since this is in Subpart 236.6, it only applies to architect-engineer contracts and not to construction contracts. I am hoping that someone has experience with this and can point me to a statute that allows design costs of more than six percent of the project's construction costs.
  11. Who can explain what this means in 'laymens' terms? This is a statement taken from paragraph b of clause 52.228-5. "The policies evidencing required insurance shall contain an endorsement to the effect that any cancellation or any material change adversely affecting the Government's interest shall not be effective (1) for such period as the laws of the State in which this contract is to be performed prescribe or (2) until 30 days after the insurer of the Contractor gives written notice to the Contracting Officer whichever period is longer" In my job, I have to convince insurance agents to put this as an endorsement on tier subcontractor's insurance certificates. Many insurance companies won't do it. Most agents want to use the standard cancellation clause that's in the policy; however, that doesn't address the material changes that could adversely affect the Government's interest. What is an example of something in an insurance policy that could be adverse to the Government?
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